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Author


 

 

 

 

 

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Author


 

 

 

 

 

JENNIFER SKUTELSKY was born in South Africa and has settled in the United States, where she lives with her daughter and three immigrant pets in San Francisco. Her first book, Breathing through Buttonholes: The Story of Madeleine Heitner, is listed at the Yad Vashem Library, while her memoir, Tin Can Shrapnel, was an Eric Hoffer Book Award Finalist. Grave of Hummingbirds, her MFA thesis at San Francisco State University, won The Clark Gross Award in the Novel. Both a softie and a warrior, Jennifer is intrigued by the distortions of love, power, transgression, and redemption. With roots in ballet and visual art, everything she does now revolves around books.

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Grave of Hummingbirds


 

 

 

 

 

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Grave of Hummingbirds


 

 

 

 

 

In the remote Andean village of Colibrí, a boy discovers what appears to be the body of an angel. But in the face and wounds of the dead, winged woman, Dr. Gregory Moreno sees something even more disturbing: an uncanny resemblance to his beloved late wife that cannot be mere chance. And in American anthropologist Sophie Lawson, still more echoes of the doctor’s lost love stir…igniting the superstitions of the townspeople, and an elusive killer’s deepest desires and despair.

When Sophie vanishes, her son and Dr. Moreno must navigate the streets, politics, and mysteries of a place where tortured ghosts and strange omens exist side by side with mortals both devout and corrupt. But they may need nothing less than a miracle to save her from sacrifice at the altar of a madman’s twisted passion.

Conjuring shades of Gabriel García Márquez, Isabel Allende, or even Neil Gaiman, Grave of Hummingbirds is a mesmerizing novel of dreams and demons, beauty and blood.

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Tin Can Shrapnel


 

 

 

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Tin Can Shrapnel


 

 

 

 

An Eric Hoffer Book Award Finalist, Tin Can Shrapnel is the story of one woman's journey to salvage hope from the hate and madness of horrific xenophobic attacks that broke out in South Africa in 2008. Reflecting the voices of a small group of men and women from the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Jennifer Skutelsky traces events leading to the accommodation of 20,000 dislocated people in refugee camps. A story of chaos and courage and missing children, it is, more than anything, a story of universal truth, and finding a way back from the end of the world.